Did you know: Healthy Food Facts

Just some interesting facts about your food, which help you to stay healthy. Knowledge is power!

  • Apples are more effective than coffee at waking you up in the morning.

  • Bananas aren’t the only fruits with potassium. Avocados have twice the amount of potassium as bananas and are rich in monounsaturated fat that is burned easily as energy. Green-tipped bananas are better for you than over-ripened bananas. Bananas contain a lot of sugar, if eaten with protein, the insulin levels are normalized.

  • Broccoli contains twice the amount of Vitamin C than and orange. It contains as much calcium as whole milk, and is more readily absorbed by our bodies.

  • Cilantro is good for digestion and also soothes many common ailments such as headache, coughs and nausea.

  • Onions are great antioxidants, containing anti-allergy, antiviral, and anti-histamine properties. The sulfur compounds found in onions help in the detoxifying the body and aid in cellular repair. Maximum health benefits are seen in raw or lightly-steamed onions.

  • Parsley is also great for use as a digestive aid. It is a natural breath freshener, anti-carcinogen, contains three times the amount of vitamin C as oranges, and twice the amount of iron as in spinach.Fresh is best—most of the time.

  • Frozen Food can be healthier than fresh. Research shows that frozen fruits are generally equal in nutrition to—and can even offer more benefits than—their fresh counterparts, says Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in New York City. One study from the University of California, Davis, found that freezing fruit helped retain nutrients such as vitamin E and minerals such as calcium and iron. Frozen fruit makes nutritious food available to us all year long.

  • Your nails and jelly beans have something in common You know that shiny, long-lasting shellac manicure you’re obsessed with? That same substance is used to give jelly beans, candy corn, and other glazed candy their shine, says Zeitlin. And that’s not even all. Shellac is actually a secretion from an insect. For a better way to satisfy your sweet tooth, join team dark chocolate—it has antioxidants and comes from the cacao plant, not some bug.

  • Mushrooms can't be overcooked! If you messed up the mushrooms for dinner, there's no excuse to hide behind now. There's a special polymer in the cell walls of mushrooms that ensure a tender taste. If you manage to overcook mushrooms, we regret to inform you that you're just an exceptionally bad cook!

  • Stickers on fruits are edible! Now you don't have to freak out when you take a bite into the sticker. Let us be clear about this fact, just because the stickers are non-toxic and edible, doesn't mean you should eat them.

  • It turns out that Bananas are actually classified as fruits, strawberries aren't! I bet that you didn't know this one. This fact tends to only be known by botanists who apparently get their kicks from misleading the public. Bananas, cucumbers, kiwis are all classed as berries. Strawberries, blackberries and raspberries are not. And now you will question everything you thought you knew.

  • Fruit snacks and cars are coated in the same type of wax. Did you ever wonder how gummy candies get that glossy sheen? They're coated with carnauba wax, the same stuff that is used on cars to make them shiny.

  • Foods, like ranch dressing or coffee creamer, can contain titanium dioxide, which can also be found in paint, plastic, and sunscreen. Titanium dioxide is a food additive that can be found in a variety of foodstuffs, like ranch dressing, coffee creamer, icing, and powdered sugar. It is often used to make whites appear whiter. However, for this same reason it can also be found in items like paint, sunscreen, and laundry detergent. While the FDA considers it safe, new research has linked the chemical to inflammatory bowel diseases, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified it as "possibly carcinogen to human."

  • Farm-raised salmon is naturally white and then dyed pink. While wild salmon are naturally pink due to the large amount of shrimp in their diet, farm-raised salmon eat differently. In order to achieve that pleasing pink color, salmon farmers add carotenoids (plant pigments) to the fish feed to mimic the natural hue of wild salmon.

  • Potatoes can absorb and reflect Wi-fi signals.When Boeing wanted to test out their wireless signal on new planes in 2012, they placed giant piles of potatoes on seats. Because of their high water content and chemical makeup, potatoes absorb and reflect radio and wireless signals just like humans do.

  • The red food dye used in Skittles is made from boiled beetles. Carmine, also known as carmine acid, is a common red food dye that can be found in Skittles, maraschino cherries, raspberry and strawberry-flavored junk food, and even lipstick. Carminic acid also happens to be made from the crushed carcasses of a beetle known as the Dactylopius coccus.

  • Your nails and jelly beans have something in common You know that shiny, long-lasting shellac manicure you’re obsessed with? That same substance is used to give jelly beans, candy corn, and other glazed candy their shine, says Zeitlin. And that’s not even all. Shellac is actually a secretion from an insect. For a better way to satisfy your sweet tooth, join team dark chocolate—it has antioxidants and comes from the cacao plant, not some bug.

  • Mushrooms can't be overcooked! If you messed up the mushrooms for dinner, there's no excuse to hide behind now. There's a special polymer in the cell walls of mushrooms that ensure a tender taste. If you manage to overcook mushrooms, we regret to inform you that you're just an exceptionally bad cook!

  • Stickers on fruits are edible! Now you don't have to freak out when you take a bite into the sticker. Let us be clear about this fact, just because the stickers are non-toxic and edible, doesn't mean you should eat them.

  • It turns out that Bananas are actually classified as fruits, strawberries aren't! I bet that you didn't know this one. This fact tends to only be known by botanists who apparently get their kicks from misleading the public. Bananas, cucumbers, kiwis are all classed as berries. Strawberries, blackberries and raspberries are not. And now you will question everything you thought you knew.

  • Fruit snacks and cars are coated in the same type of wax. Did you ever wonder how gummy candies get that glossy sheen? They're coated with carnauba wax, the same stuff that is used on cars to make them shiny.

  • Foods, like ranch dressing or coffee creamer, can contain titanium dioxide, which can also be found in paint, plastic, and sunscreen. Titanium dioxide is a food additive that can be found in a variety of foodstuffs, like ranch dressing, coffee creamer, icing, and powdered sugar. It is often used to make whites appear whiter. However, for this same reason it can also be found in items like paint, sunscreen, and laundry detergent. While the FDA considers it safe, new research has linked the chemical to inflammatory bowel diseases, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified it as "possibly carcinogen to human."

  • Farm-raised salmon is naturally white and then dyed pink. While wild salmon are naturally pink due to the large amount of shrimp in their diet, farm-raised salmon eat differently. In order to achieve that pleasing pink color, salmon farmersadd carotenoids (plant pigments) to the fish feed to mimic the natural hue of wild salmon.

  • Potatoes can absorb and reflect Wi-fi signals.When Boeing wanted to test out their wireless signal on new planes in 2012, they placed giant piles of potatoes on seats. Because of their high water content and chemical makeup, potatoes absorb and reflect radio and wireless signals just like humans do.

  • The red food dye used in Skittles is made from boiled beetles. Carmine, also known as carmine acid, is a common red food dye that can be found in Skittles, maraschino cherries, raspberry and strawberry-flavored junk food, and even lipstick. Carminic acid also happens to be made from the crushed carcasses of a beetle known as the Dactylopius coccus.

Your health coach Angela

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